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Social Media WireLists10 300pxEvery wireless mic system has two parts: a transmitter connected to a microphone or source and a receiver that picks up the transmitted signal. Both of them have antennas - one to put out the signal and one (or more) to receive it. The area between the antennas is where most drop-out issues occur.

Start by identifying what kind of drop-out you're dealing with:

a) RF drop-out can be seen on the RF Meter. The meter will drop as the drop-out occurs. With Wireless Designer or with a DSQD receiver, the 10 second RF history display can help with identifying which channel/s are experiencing RF dropouts.

b) Pilot tone drop-out can be seen on the Pilot Tone Indicator. If the RF Meter shows sufficient RF signal, but the Pilot Tone Indicator shows a loss of Pilot Tone, try bypassing the Pilot Tone. If the audio is now acceptable, the problem is Pilot Tone drop-out.


Social Media WireLists9 300pxIf you own one of our rack receivers, you’re no doubt familiar with Wireless Designer. We specifically developed it to be intuitive and easy to use. Here are three things that you might be unaware of that can enhance your experience and utility when using this software:

Firmware Updates

Lectrosonics RSS FeedKeeping your firmware updated is critical to ensure that your equipment performs as designed. Did you know that we have an RSS feed at the bottom of our Firmware page that will alert you when you need to download an update? If you don’t already have one, search and install an RSS reader for your browser of choice or download a mobile RSS app to get notifications. Then visit the Support page and click on the RSS icon.


Social Media WireLists8 300pxWhat do all of these musicians have in common? Hint: It’s the way they’re holding their mics. Someone, somewhere gave them a lesson in attenuation.

Lectrosonics Listicles 8 Singers

What is RF attenuation and why should I care about it?

As you know, what most refer to as “wireless mics” are actually wireless hand-held transmitters. A transmitter is any device that sends out a wireless signal – electromagnetic waves via a transmitting antenna – to another device that interprets those waves, called a receiver.


Social Media WireLists7It’s Winter time again! And unless you live in a tropical climate, Winter means one thing: COLD. Regardless of the time of year, many of you also run sound in perpetually cold locales, such as the Arctic Circle, Siberia or Mongolia. Contrary to popular belief, electronics, unlike Husky dogs, don’t actually like the cold. Your transmitters and recorders can deliver reduced performance and even fail to work below certain temperatures unless you take precautions. Here are four areas to pay attention to when operating or storing your equipment over the next several months:

LCD Displays

LCD displays – such as the ones on our transmitters and receivers - use liquid crystal fluid (more like a gel) in the display. Like all other non-solids, the liquid crystal can freeze in cold conditions. Ideally, you should store any equipment with an LCD display in consistent temperatures between 40° and 100°F to keep the liquid crystal from freezing.


Social Media WireLists6 300pxAre you having issues with battery drain or inconsistent power in your SSM, in spite of using fresh batteries each time? Are you hearing an odd, intermittent scratch-click that you can’t trace to any of your other equipment? If you’ve checked everything else, the problem might just be a pogo pin.

What is a pogo pin?

A pogo pin, which is a common term for the positive battery spring contact and is used in the design of all electronics using prismatic (square) batteries, is so-called because it acts like a toy pogo stick. Though they look like solid pins if you look into the battery case, pogo pins are two part housings, with an integrated helical spring inside that applies a constant normal force against the back of the contact plate. This spring counteracts any unwanted movement which might cause an intermittent connection with batteries. They’re very small parts – smaller than a pencil lead - that can cause big problems if they malfunction. Pogo failures don’t happen very often with Lectrosonics products, but they can happen. Most maddeningly, if one is the cause of an SSM’s visit to Repair, it’s one of the less obvious, head-scratcher things that can happen. As they say, You learn something new every day. Fortunately, the causes of most pogo pin failures are 99.9% within your control (the other .1% being manufacturer defect).


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